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May 2024

This time four years ago you were hearing (non-stop!) about the numbers dying, and how the life changes being forced on you and society were warranted. Because we had to ‘save lives’.

Yet so far this year we’ve seen 874 more death notices than by the same time in 2020. But now there’s no official concern about saving lives. In fact there’s silence.

How come?

More thought-provoking graphs on our National Picture and Counties pages.

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“Shout it as loudly as possible from the hilltops of Europe”

“Another truth that’s being suppressed”

We are very glad that, in Tuam on Saturday, an audience question raised our work with European Parliament candidates John Waters and Una McGurk.

Glad too that our inspiration Patrick E. Walsh was also referenced.

Video will start where we are mentioned. Issues with video? Try watching direct on Odysee.1This video was Part 3 from the event’s coverage. Here are Part 1 and Part 2.


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April 2024

12,481 death notices in the first four months of 2020 – and media, public health and politicians were clamouring about the numbers dying.

635 more (13,116) in the first four months of 2024 – yet now media, public health and politicians are quiet about the greater numbers dying. Why?

How are the numbers in your county?

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March 2024

For March we counted 3177 death notices, bringing us to 10074 for the first quarter of 2024.. This is on par with the previous three years but up 15% on the first quarter of 2020.

More details on The National Picture.

How’s your county doing?

Scroll our Counties page and see for yourself.

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February 2024

February 2020 (the previous leap year) saw 2717 death notices. An average of 94 per day.

This February we see 3161. An average of 109 per day. That’s a 16% increase.

How’s your county doing?

Scroll our Counties page and see for yourself.


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January 2024

Up 430 on December 2023 death notices. More details on The National Picture and individual county pages.


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Ireland to end of 2023

While still well above what historical patterns might lead us to expect, the number of December 2023 death notices1Based on date of publication, not date of death. Also, as we each use different methods of gathering, cleaning and processing our data there will be slight differences between our figures and those of Ireland Excess Deaths and Irish Quislings. But we’re each seeing the same trends. suggest an easing of the upward trend.

What’s happening in your county? Find out here.


  • 1
    Based on date of publication, not date of death. Also, as we each use different methods of gathering, cleaning and processing our data there will be slight differences between our figures and those of Ireland Excess Deaths and Irish Quislings. But we’re each seeing the same trends.
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Now 26 counties

We had only managed 22 counties before changes to RIP.ie hampered us.

Now, thanks to great help from a few sources, we have been able to start again. This time with improved accuracy AND the previously missing four counties of Cork, Dublin, Kerry and Louth,1In the interest of transparency you can still view an archive of our original 22-county work here.

All 26 counties are listed alphabetically on our Counties page.

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    In the interest of transparency you can still view an archive of our original 22-county work here.
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Our latest national picture

This week we were contacted by someone far more adept at spreadsheets. So redoing our figures just got easier, we now have a fairly good overview of the national picture and can soon update our county pages.

Meanwhile here are our numbers for the country.

Keep in mind that, as we each use different methods of gathering, cleaning and processing our data, there will be slight differences1To date the biggest difference we’ve noted is about 1% and for 2016 only. All other years we tend to be within 0.01% and 0.5% of each other. between our figures and those of Ireland Excess Deaths and Irish Quislings.

But we’re each seeing the same trends.

Thankfully, while still well above what historical patterns suggest we should expect, November death notices on RIP.ie suggest an easing of the upward trend. We can see this in the average death notices per month and week.


  • 1
    To date the biggest difference we’ve noted is about 1% and for 2016 only. All other years we tend to be within 0.01% and 0.5% of each other.
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CSO admits excess deaths and endorses RIP.ie but…

Kilkenny accountant Patrick E. Walsh continues his sleuthing.

His most recent exploration of the October 4th Central Statistics Office (CSO) publication suggests ‘Official Ireland’ could be angling to ‘disappear’ the growing proportion of our people that are dying.

“The CSO has indirectly confirmed excess mortality rates in a recent publication and come up with a way to ‘hide’ current and future excess death rates…

It was issued quietly and ties in with the lies and half truths put forward by ‘Official Ireland’ in response to questions put to a TD about the extraordinary rate of excess mortality in Ireland…

I realise this is long and at times complicated but please stick with it as I believe this is vitally important in understanding how ‘Official Ireland’ is going to ‘disappear’ excess mortality in the coming years while not actually directly acknowledging what is going on at the moment…”

Patrick E. Walsh

Worth reading in full.

He also discussed what he found (and gave us a shout out – thanks Patrick!) with Gerry O’Neill a few days ago: